Hikmat S. Hilal
Nature of Work
Academic
Profession
Emeritus prof
Email Address
[email protected]
Office Phone
(+970) 9 2345113 Ext. 882385

Hikmat S. Hilal

Nature of Work
Academic
Profession
Emeritus prof
Email Address
[email protected]
Office Phone
(+970) 9 2345113 Ext. 882385
Energy Nano Technology - 463864
Course Title
Energy Nano Technology
Course Number
463864
Instructor Name
Hikmat S. Hilal
Contact Information
[email protected]
Semester(s) and academic year(s)
First Semester 2021
Compulsory / Elective
Elective
Course Description

The course starts with basic concepts of materials, nanomaterials and nanotechnology. In depth understanding of the nano-phenomenon is included, with no assumed pre-knowledge. In depth understanding the special features for nanomaterials, their building blocks, top-down and bottom-up preparations, characterizations and various applications are included. Applications of nanomaterials in various electronic systems, with renewable energy domains being the core subject of the course. Basic concepts of conventional (1st generation) bulk p-n homojunctions, heterojunctions and tandem photovoltaic cells are included, with their features and shortcomings. Nano-scale thin film solar cells are then heavily involved, showing 2nd and 3rd generations. Latest developments in the field, including dye sensitized solar cells and organic solar cells are also studied. Methods to measure solar cell performance (short circuit photocurrent JSC, open circuit potential VOC, fill factor FF, photoconversion efficiency PCE, incident photon to current efficiency IPCE, and cell stability) are studied. Using nanomaterials to convert solar light into chemical energy (i.e. water-to-hydrogen and CO2 activation) and in environmental cleanup is also studied. In short, role of nanotechnology in power production and power storage, is highlighted, with the approach from-research-to-market

Course Objectives

The goal of this course is multi-fold. Familiarity with basic concepts of solid state, conductivity, p-n junctions and other basic aspects of semiconductor is the starting up. Light-to-electricity conversion processes in conventional photovoltaic systems will be targeted, together with optimizing cell performance.  Applications of nanotechnology in power production (PV, thin films, DSSCs, hydrogen production), power storage (batteries, hydrogen storage, supercapacitors) and environmental preservation (contaminant removal, CO2 conversion) will all be studied (at lab, R&D and commercial scales). The learner will then be able to find out new areas of research in the field where he/she will be able to investigate, either in simulation or experimentally, and write up a feasible proposal in the area.

Intended learning Outcomes and Competences

After completing the course, the learner will be able to:

  1. Survey basic scientific foundations of conventional photovoltaic devices based on p-n junctions
  2. Describe and study various solar cell parameters, and strategies to overcome challenges to enhance solar cell performance,
  3. Survey new nanotechnology trends (concepts of the nano-phenomenon, special features, nanofilms, p-n junctions) together with preparation and characterization methods.
  4. Investigate how light-to-power conversion occurs in nano-film based solar cells and determine solar cell performance (VOC, JSC, FF, PCE, IPCE and stability)
  5. Describe role of nanotechnology in power production and various power storage systems (modern batteries, hydrogen production, hydrogen storage, CO2 capturing, transistor technology, etc.).

6. Use online literature to write down feasible research proposals related to nano-technology applications in renewable energy (thin films, power production, hydrogen production & storage, CO2 conversions, environmental cleanup, DSSC development) at lab or commercial levels.

Textbook and References

- Bradley Falham, Materials Chemistry, 2nd Edition, Springer, 2011

- Harry O. Finklea, Semiconductor Electrodes, Elsevier, 1982

- Mongraphs on the subject

- Online resources and journals

Assessment Criteria
Activity Percent (%)
Midterm exams (1+2) 30%
Final Exam Theory 35%
Final Exam Practical-Power point 15%
Student Activitied 20%